Medically Unexplained Symptoms

Mental health: recovery, crisis and prevention

Partner Organisations

  • Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust
  • South Central Clinical Commissioning Group
  • Karis Medical Practice
  • Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Midlands and Lancashire Commissioning Support Unit
  • Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care West Midlands Centre for Mental Health
  • Health Education West Midlands

Themes

  • Education and skills
  • Innovation and adoption

Date Initiated

31 March 2014

Project Status

In Progress

Led by a multi-organisational, cross-disciplinary team, the Medically Unexplained Symptoms (MUS) programme has delivered a comprehensive approach to training for a range of professionals, tested the first phase of case identification process and algorithm and patient journey mapping, ensured regional and national recognition engagement and support and engaged senior acute clinicians in four departments to further identify MUS.

The planned outcome was a structured approach to the systematic identification and support of people with Medically Unexplained Symptoms built on a review of previous pilot work and existing training provision.

Programme Outcomes

  • Executive summary of previous work.
  • An agreed information sharing protocol across the partnership of mental health acute hospital and CSU to allow sharing and analysis of data.
  • A comprehensive approach to training for a range of professionals (literature review, gap analysis and training ladder).
  • Tested first phase of case identification process and algorithm and patient journey mapping.
  • Ensuring regional and national recognition engagement and support (HEWM, AHSN, CLAHRC WM and Royal Colleges).
  • Initial cohort analysis for primary care, MUS RAID cases.
  • Project team are members of an expert reference group – tasked to deliver national commissioning evidence by the end of the year
  • Engagement of senior acute clinicians in four departments to further identify MUS.
  • The involvement of different specialists on the project team has enabled a greater understanding of the implications of MUS across general practice, community, mental health and acute care, which is being shared across the region through the WMAHSN Mental Health Advisory Group.
  • Promotion of this work has taken place at a national level through the joint Royal Colleges working group for MUS
  • Senior clinicians in the project team are contributing to national commissioning guidance.
  • A review of MUS training interventions which can be shared.
  • One academic, one acute trust, one mental health trust, three regional partners, one voluntary sector, one CSU and one CCG organisations involved in project delivery.

Programme Lead

Sarah Appleby
e: sarah.appleby@wmahsn.org
t: 0121 371 8061